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Thread: Seperated by the same language...

  1. #1
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    Seperated by the same language...

    Am I the only person to be constantly amused by the differences in US-English language and the UK-English language. For example: -

    US - UK
    Donuts - doughnuts
    Color - colour
    Harbor - harbour
    pants - trousers
    hood - bonnet
    trunk - boot
    suspenders - braces
    program - programme


    Any more?
    From the point of ignition
    to the final drive
    the point of the journey
    is not to arrive
    anything can happen

  2. #2
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    I'm sure we have a "whole bunch" more.

  3. #3
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    diapers - nappies

    flashlight - torch

    cookie - biscuit


    "... the nighttime falls around our bed, in peace we sleep entwined, and your love flows through me, though an ocean soothes my head, I burn for you..."


  4. #4
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    Chips - crisps
    Fries - chips
    soccer - football
    football - american football
    From the point of ignition
    to the final drive
    the point of the journey
    is not to arrive
    anything can happen

  5. #5
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    Elevator ~ Lift

    Bathroom (Toilet) ~ Loo
    "I knew a transsexual guy whose only ambition was to eat, drink, and be Mary." ~ George Carlin.

  6. #6
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    Keep it going!

    I am loving the translations. I do love the English more so then the U.S. versions. I also think even a curse word sounds sophisticated when the English speak it!
    I know that when Spanish speaking people murder the English language, it is sometimes jokingly called Spanglish. What should we call the U.S. mangled versions of proper English? Who can come up with a good one?

  7. #7
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    Re: Keep it going!

    Originally posted by rkerchic
    I am loving the translations. I do love the English more so then the U.S. versions. I also think even a curse word sounds sophisticated when the English speak it!
    I know that when Spanish speaking people murder the English language, it is sometimes jokingly called Spanglish. What should we call the U.S. mangled versions of proper English? Who can come up with a good one?
    "Ameringlish"? I dunno...

    I am enjoying the translations, too!

  8. #8
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    stroller - pram

    sweater - jumper
    "Even the devil may cry when he looks around Hell and realizes that he is all alone"

    Acheron Parthenopaeus

    (Sherrilyn Kenyon, Devil May Cry)



    http://www.wordclay.com/BookStore/BookStoreBookDetails.aspx?bookid=37784

  9. #9
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    here is one for you wilkie ... discussing that very same thing about spelling and words.....

    I posted the Whole thing ... Under Political Jokes in the Sign of Fire ...




    BRITS REVOKE USA INDEPENDENCE (:

    You should look up "revocation" in the Oxford English Dictionary. Then look up aluminium, and check the pronunciation guide. You will be amazed at just how wrongly you have been pronouncing it. The letter 'U' will be reinstated in words such as 'favour' and 'neighbour.' Likewise, you will learn to spell 'doughnut' without skipping half the letters, and the suffix ize will be replaced by the suffix ise. Generally, you will be expected to raise your vocabulary to acceptable levels. (look up vocabulary).

    Using the same twenty-seven words interspersed with filler noises such as "like" and "you know" is an unacceptable and inefficient form of communication. There is no such thing as US English. We will let Microsoft know on your behalf. The Microsoft spell-checker will be adjusted to take account of the reinstated letter 'u' and the elimination of -ize.


    oohh... and
    Jumper= sweater....

    I also really like "Englsih Expressions" ...Like " steady on" and " you Silly suasage " Cheeky beggar.,....etc... Always makes me laugh or smile....
    You pass like the moon in silence
    In the warm flooded air
    Looking back to those lost opportunities
    So often missed or ignored
    A thousand times I start heading for the dawn
    Only to turn around and face this rue once more
    There 's something ahead of you
    Cy Curnin

    Don't die, with your music still inside of you.

  10. #10
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    Alot of differences in "z" and "s" plus "or" and "our" ...
    Many times, I catch myself using what I thought perhaps was an older version in spelling, only to find out later it's actually the UK way...LOL!

    flavor ~ flavour
    humor ~ humour
    realize ~ realise
    organize ~ organise

    oh, and one random other:

    jeweler ~ jeweller

    Kim
    My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.
    ~Dalai Lama

    I reject your reality and substitute my own.
    ~Adam Savage

  11. #11
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    Trash Can (US) - Rubbish Bin (UK)
    Trash Bag (US) - Bin Liner (UK)
    Truck (US) - Lorry (UK)

    I find myself using British grammar on occasion, espeically the collective plural (the band ARE, instead of the band IS). I also use phrases from British English on occasion. My boy kitty loves to sleep propped up on a pillow on the bed, so I pull a corner of the comforter down to cover him, telling him he needs to be "tucked up" (we use "tucked in" in the US). I also call him Mr. Moggy (Moggy is Scottish slang for cat that has made its way into general British use).
    Last edited by Bash; 02-03-2006 at 05:35 PM.
    web site | blog | photos | Twitter (primary)
    ----
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    Now the fix(x), the fix(x) is in." - Elbow

  12. #12
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    Okay, mine is grammatical. Quotation punctuation.

    You may have noticed that in UK publications, punctuation ends within the quotation marks, like... I talked to Adam and he said, "hello". In the US version, the punctuation, with only a few rare exceptions, should always end inside the quotation marks... I talked to Adam and he said, "hello."

    I remember getting into an arm wrestling match with an editor in the UK who was printing some marketing materials for me once. He insisted on moving all of my periods outside the quotation marks. I understood why, but I had to basically order him to move them back, because the publication was going to recieve more distribution to American businesses and I dreaded being dinged by the inevitable grammar policeman who would read it and "correct" us.

    Okay, so why do we do it the other way here? Chalk it up to American frugality. Apparently, in the old days of hand set type, the periods were fragile and prone to getting broken off, so the thrifty American printers tucked them inside the quotation marks, where they would be safe.

    Hope that wasn't too snore-inducing.

  13. #13
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    STILL stuck in the water slide at the Vegas Hard Rock pool...
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    Musegirl, thanks for explaining how this came about. It drives me NUTS that we include punctuation inside a quote it doesn't belong to, and I almost always make the "mistake" of leaving it outside. Then I have to go correct myself...

    Add in my crappy typing skills, and I'm covered in Wite-Out.
    web site | blog | photos | Twitter (primary)
    ----
    "And the Vino di Vici will flow like a river in spring,
    Now the fix(x), the fix(x) is in." - Elbow

  14. #14
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    Differences

    Probaly the most important thing even as a tourist or car collector is the infamous RHD Right hand drive versus the LHD left hand drive (this is where the steering wheel is)




















    even the judges kneel and pray
    johninpittsburgh

  15. #15
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    Originally posted by Bash
    I find myself using British grammar on occasion, espeically the collective plural (the band ARE, instead of the band IS).
    Very strange to hear when you're talking about sports teams. For instance, Brits would say that Pittsburgh are the favourite in the Super Bowl, where we would say that Pittsburgh is the favorite.

    And nobody can figure oot the Canucks. Spell like them, talk like us (mostly).
    If you don't know where you're going, any road will take you there. - GH 1943-2001

    A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. - Thomas Jefferson's first Inaugural Address, 1801

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