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Thread: Plant your garden soon

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Seattle
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    1,593
    BM--you're lucky to have a green thumb! Keep posting your garden tips!

    I've always struggled at growing plants--friends have said it's because plants can "sense" vegetarians...I guess plants have fear...LOL!

    Climate change has been affecting us up here...these past couple of summers have been very irregular, so I've been told.

    Last year, the only thing that did well and produced for us were a few assorted herbs, the fig tree and the jalapenos! LOL! Who knew?! Hot peppers in the cool PacNW!

    This year, it's tomatoes, tarragon and chives...everything else has given up the ghost. Something has been eating at the figs, so no luck there. We should be seeing ripe tomatoes in another week--lots of green ones out there now (couple each of Roma, Cherry and a Russian eating variety). My husband has an amazing freezer spaghetti sauce he makes, so we'll use them up for that.

    My brother grows his tomatoes n' peppers in buckets hanging upside down! He's had great success with habaneros, but he's in SC--the heat.

    Kim
    My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.
    ~Dalai Lama

    I reject your reality and substitute my own.
    ~Adam Savage

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Deep in the Hundred Acre Woods
    Posts
    544
    Kim,
    You raise a very good point for home gardeners - planning ahead for a variety of seasonal changes. For example, one should plant a variety of vegetables, some that do better than others in drought, some that do better in high rainfall situations where root rot from too much water could be a problem.

    Basically - bring diversity to your plan for your garden. This is another thing I'm reading up on.
    BM
    I've been lurking...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,650
    BM, would love to see pics of your critters someday, if circumstances allow! I'm fascinated even with bugs.

    Funny story of the day...my co-worker was in the restroom when she noticed a beetle scurrying around her feet. Not wanting to crunch it under her shoe, she reached for the only possible weapon at hand - a can of room freshener - and sprayed it on the poor thing! Of course, it did nothing to kill the bug, who ran away. Another co-worker went and rescued it to the outdoors (I think; I hope she didn't kill it, but she usually doesn't), but not before I observed, "That's gonna be one good-smellin' bug"! Hehehe

    I keep getting more and more broccoli from the same plant, and my onion plant is getting ready to have flowers. Cool.
    Maybe on course to the best yet!

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,593
    BM & Carrie- do you do "square foot" gardening? And companion planting?

    Kim
    My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.
    ~Dalai Lama

    I reject your reality and substitute my own.
    ~Adam Savage

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,650
    I'm gonna say no, since I haven't heard of either one. I have literally a tiny strip of dirt on either side of the walk to my apartment building, so you might call mine "square inch" gardening
    Maybe on course to the best yet!

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Deep in the Hundred Acre Woods
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    544
    MsSmith - yes, I have planted corn, squash, and beans before such as the native american "3 sisters" method. Not sure how that planting technique turned out this year. I'm not tending garden back home but I hear it's going ok.
    There are several books out there on how to maximize productivity per square foot in a cramped situation. My goal - own enough land to not worry about that problem.
    Harvest is coming soon...
    BM
    I've been lurking...

  7. #22
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Deep in the Hundred Acre Woods
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    544
    This is an old thread now, but just sending an annual reminder - it's planting time in the Northern Hemisphere for most climates. I'm now fortunate enough to grow things year round here in the tropics.

    Anyone else having success at gardening or have a story to tell?

    One book I can recommend, having read it: "How to Grow More Vegetables and Fruits (and Fruits, Nuts, Berries, Grains, and Other Crops) Than You Ever Thought Possible on Less Land Than You Can Imagine" by John Jeavons.

    http://www.amazon.com/Vegetables-Ber.../dp/1580087965

    BM
    I've been lurking...

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    89
    Just today, I planted tomatoes, green onions, green beans, two type of strawberry plants, green,red and yellow peppers. All are organic. I hope they will grow. I have them in large pots because, where I live, the ground is indian clay.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Deep in the Hundred Acre Woods
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    544
    edelweiss,
    So sorry that I am replying over a year later! The book I linked previously was updated shortly after I posted and is on its 8th edition now, and frequently used as a college textbook for organic farming. The technique described is the "French Intensive Method" for a raised bed garden that folds in compost. Translated - even your Indian Clay can be transformed into a different soil quality by folding compost in. If you buy and use a composter, you're making your own fertilizer and future garden soil that over time can tip the balance of your predominant clay soil for a local raised garden. That's one of the key points of the book and this method, is that it doesn't matter what you start with, you can intensively manage small squares of land to grow more veggies per square foot than other methods and crowd more plants in than normally would be advised in traditional row crop plantings.

    This year I have focused more time toward fruit trees and vines - a young Mango tree that sprouted its first fruit this year (all 2 of them), Lilikoi vine, giant starfruit tree, and a young dwarf tangerine tree. I've enjoyed my tropical setting but look forward to one day having a normal 4-season year and normal planting seasons again.
    BM
    I've been lurking...

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