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Thread: Haunting guitar of JWO...as often described

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Haunting guitar of JWO...as often described

    However, I do not get it. I cannot think of one FIXX song that sounds haunting to me. I don't think that is the right description of the JWO sound at all. My sense of a haunting sound is something unpleasant that makes me fell ill at ease. In fact, the last thing I wanted to feel is "haunted". Since there is not one FIXX record that is unpleasant in any way to me, that sort of strikes "haunting" from my list of adjectives describing FIXX songs.

    Interested in other opinions.

  2. #2
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    To me the haunting element in their sound is Rupert's keyboards, in songs like Camphor, Facing The Wind, Less Cities, Stand or Fall. But it's not an unease-type of haunting, more wistful, melancholy. An old girlfriend of mine once described the Fixx as sounding "lonely." I think that's spot on.

    Not sure what word best describes Jamie's guitar playing. Fractured, slashing, bell-like. Reminds me of '80s-era Alex Lifeson.

  3. #3
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    There are "haunting" moods or effects in several songs by The Fixx. Not just because it's near Halloween, but clearly "Phantom Living" stands out as one of the more unusual cuts by the band. In that song, aside from the other non-guitar effects, the guitar solo toward the end when Jamie uses the whammy bar to take the tone very low then slowly elevate - I would call that one haunting at minimum.

    "Red Skies" was like a warning siren in the form of a song, so I tend to look at that song as having a dark/warning tone, to include the guitar work. I tended to look at "Facing the Wind" and "Camphor" as having an optimistic approach in the face of troubles or challenges, so I am mixed toward the prior response.

    Regardless, it's always nice to have intellectual conversation with fellow Fixxtures out there!
    BM
    I've been lurking...

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkman View Post
    To me the haunting element in their sound is Rupert's keyboards, in songs like Camphor, Facing The Wind, Less Cities, Stand or Fall. But it's not an unease-type of haunting, more wistful, melancholy. An old girlfriend of mine once described the Fixx as sounding "lonely." I think that's spot on.

    Not sure what word best describes Jamie's guitar playing. Fractured, slashing, bell-like. Reminds me of '80s-era Alex Lifeson.
    Wistful melancholy, yes. Like Outside, the final track on RTB. It's like the music is walking away and leaving you alone with your thoughts. I also think the extended versions of I Will and Secret Separation bring out JWO's (hauntingly) melancholic side. Also, there's a "haunting" solo between In Suspense and Wish on Live in the USA. It has the fractured quality you describe. Not a melodic solo, but incredibly effective and beautiful.

  5. #5
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    Just as Beached Male said, I thought of the same song...."Phantom Living" off of the Phantoms album. Jamie does a great job to evoke various feelings.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    "Jamie is a texturist guitarist."

    I can understand that haunting has that connotation to you, Ginger.

    To me, ever since I heard the chords on Stand or Fall, I always got a feeling of "distance" as the tones fade out in those instances with the long notes, something that came to feel characteristic of the songs, lyrics and melody.

    Check out Octopulse & Diamond's replies to me in here:

    http://www.thefixx.net/showthread.ph...score-question

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    rupe...

    Haunting huh?

    Tell me that Rupert couldn't make a horror movie soundtrack that would scare the living hell outta ya with his spacial textured soundscapes? x
    "There can be no tradition without innovation."
    - Earle Hitchner, Irish music journalist

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